Sizzling Summer Classes: Principles of Public Speaking

July 13, 2017
man speaking at lectern

We’re taking a peek inside the classroom to offer students a sampling of what they might experience. This week we visited a public speaking class on Tidewater Community College’s Norfolk Campus to see learning in progress.  

Inside the classroom:  

man speaking at lectern in front of classroomStudents in Principles of Public Speaking (CST 100) explore the theory of public address and practice speech preparation and delivery. The class takes on a Socratic approach, teaching students critical thinking skills and the art of persuasive speech through a series of oral presentations and “open-mic” activities.

Why this class sizzles: 

Our students’ stories bring this class to life. Through various learning activities, students gain a better sense of who they are and where they are going. “By the time my students leave this class, they are all talking and sharing. I teach them to vindicate their visceral voice and visualize speech as a story.” – TCC instructor Sharon Waters 

Who needs it? 

Many of TCC’s transfer degrees require public speaking or introduction to communications as part of the degree plan, including the new Associate of Science in General Studies with a Specialization in Professional Communications

Student voices: 

“This class helps me be comfortable talking in front of an audience and getting thoughts together. Everyone is going to be talking to people in their careers and life and this is a great class to prepare for that.” – Da’Vine Chavez, social sciences  

“I’m learning how to organize my ideas and not be shy. I enjoy the diversity of the people in the class, with many born decades apart. I’m taking things I learn with me for my daily life.” –  Tiara Lassiter, general studies 

About the instructor:

woman speaking at lecternWaters has taught public speaking at TCC since 1998. She earned her master’s in film from the University of Southern California and her Ph.D. in communication studies from Regent University. She deems herself a lifelong learner and enjoys the diverse culture in the classroom.

“My students range from ages 18 to 73. Learning never stops and neither does speaking.”